To Tailwind or Not

An article, posted 4 months ago filed in tailwind, css, frameworks & bem.

Tailwind is a popular utility first based CSS framework, something that front-end developers can use to make a page look more stunning and/or more consistent. A few interesting takes on tailwind, one of the most popular utility first css frameworks:

I am still not convinced about Tailwind. Heck, I’m even not a major fan of full BEM, although I use it when I am building more complex components with mutiple thightly coupled related parts. The principles behind IT CSS still form the basis of how I prefer to like CSS (note: the author of IT CSS, Harry Robert, is also maintaining a [guideline on how to write maintainable CSS](https://murb.nl/feed_items…

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My first JSF: Stateless vs. stateful

An article, posted more than 12 years ago filed in web, design, work, frameworks, java, jsf, programming, stateful & stateless.

I've started working in a company that creates web applications. I discovered a new way of looking at websites, that of websites as an application…."Hello, have you been sleeping? Wasn't 'RIA' (Rich Internet Application) one of the buzzwords (a few years ago)?"Yes yes yes, but only recently I found out that the application view differs quite a lot from the view, my initial view, that websites are in essence only a source of information. In my opinion, information should be bookmarkable (and thus be unaffected by the state of things; stateless). But what about applications running on the web, which are essentially still sites on the world wide web?JSF, a tool I only recently started working with is a tool that is focussed at creating webapplications… and it definitly seems to prefer the stateful approach in creating such web applications (the resulting html pages rely on a session managing the state of things). Originally, I found the output of JSF rather …

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