Let Facebook entertain you

An article, posted almost 5 years ago filed in , , , , & .

I tend to think we should be happy with the type of experiments Facebook is doing: since they're publishing them out in the open. It makes us aware that we're all transmitting emotions which affect others. If Facebook could be held responsible for a few suicides more because of that experiment, we should all be held responsible for suicides as we communicated the emotions in the first place.

Facebook is an amusement park in which you're constantly being monitored and entertained by your peers, optimized by Facebook's algorithms, to make your time there as enjoyable as possible. That's basically what real world amusement parks also do.

Doesn't that conflict with your privacy? Well Facebook & privacy, don't get me started: Facebook isn't meant to be private first place.

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The better interface: Is it about fun, or about identity?

An article, posted more than 10 years ago filed in , , , , & .

Ryan, at the 37 signals' signal vs. noise blog, quotes an article at techradar about 'Why Apple is great at interfaces when others are not':I like how Nick draws a connection between good UI and ‘fun’. We don’t talk much about fun in usability circles.In the techradar article, elements like the nodding password entry box when a faulty password is entered, and other supposedly minor adjustments to the interface are making the interface more 'fun' to work with. But I'd say that that isn't really about fun, but has more to do with 'identity'? The computer can be made more personal with only slight tweaks. It can be made to have character.Fun to me is more like little features that may make you smile every now and then… that, however, doesn't make a great interface. Character, identity, on the other hand, could. It allows you to get to know the beast in front of you. Connect. Understand. Understandable interfaces make usable, user friendly, machines. Machines you…

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Effect of quality loss on the perception of emotion

An article, posted about 11 years ago filed in , , & .

The central question in this document is whether sound quality degradation affects the perception of emotion. Based on this short review of literature I believe that it is safe to assume that as long as the contents of speech is intelligible, emotions can be heard.Note: This document one of the 'darlings' that I had to kill to keep my thesis focussed. I've invested little effort in making this a great piece for reading… (This document was written as an early summary of my literature review that was part of my graduation project. As a result of this investigation I decided not to dive into this matter any further)"Sound quality" has been analyzed systematically in emotion perception research in the form of inference studies (Scherer, 2003) which have been employed to investigate which properties of a sound are most important for the communication of emotions. One methodology for analyzing the respective contribution In one of these studies, of each parame…

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