Headings in sections

An article, posted 15 days ago filed in html, semantics, semantic, aria, accessibility, basics & xhtml.
Headings in sections

Some observations on headings in sections elements in HTML.

Below demonstrates that the h1-element adjusts it's appearance level based on the section element. This is conform the standard. It is behaving like the h-element as I remember it being proposed with XHTML2. When inspecting the attributes in Firefox's accessibility inspector, however, the level attribute is still equal to the element's number. Also, this increase in appeared header-level doesn't change for h2-elements and up.

Example

h1 in div-element h2 in div-element h3 in div-element

h1 in section-element Not all h1 are equal h2 in section-element Notice how the h2 is like the h1 within the section h3 in section-element

Code pen of this example

So what?

  • Why isn't the level as reported in the accessibility increased to match the appearance?
  • Why aren't the other heading elements affected?
  • Why did HTML5 not defin…

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Semantics before anything else

An article, posted almost 6 years ago filed in semantic, css, styling, bem, web, design & methodology.

My first rule in styling websites or applications is to style semantics over anything else.

  1. First use as much of the agreed upon tags and properties that the latest HTML spec gives you
  2. Extend this with microformats or schema.org-vocabularies and what else you can find that is an (pseudo-)standard for semantic markup
  3. Finally, if no matching semantically rich descriptors can be found, try to think of future proof names for your elements that may be reusable. Think "metadata div(vision)”, "(search) result" (you may style result here and add another more specific styling for search results).

Style the semantical markup. Semantics is about meaning, and by defining your content's meaning in html and highlighting this meaning with your style brings you consistency from the start. This is not only nice to you as a maintainer of code, but also to your audience. It leads to consistent, predictable behaviors.

The counter movem…

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