Own and publish it yourself

An article, posted more than 9 years ago filed in , , , , , , , , , , & .

In an ideal world, content has just a single place it lives, speaking W3Cish, at the URL. Preferably, I'd say, that URL is part of your domain. You created the content and therefore you should own the content and also publish it. I don't think it has much to do with 'ego' (which has a negative connotation), but is more about 'identity'. Think about Andrew Keen's critique on all this web2.0 user generated content. Keen basically says that much of the user generated content is lacking attribution. Because it is is lacking attribution it is hard to value, hard to judge, which is a bad thing in a culture where we build ideas on top of others. Owning and publishing the content yourself (via your own 'blog') solves that issue to some extend. But that is in theory. You want to make sure readers find your ramblings, hence it is important to make sure your work is where your readers are. The thing you could do right now is simply duplicate your content. But the primary source should be your …

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Andrew Keen - De @-cultuur. Een boekbespreking

An article, posted more than 10 years ago filed in , , , , , & .

Ik had er al een paar keer met een knipoog naar verwezen, meneer Andrew Keen. Andrew Keen is bekend geworden met het schrijven van het boek 'The cult of the amateur'. Dat ik met een knipoog naar hem verwees wil niet zeggen dat ik hem niet serieus nam. Maar onlangs heb ik hem pas echt serieus genomen, door simpelweg zijn boek eens goed door te lezen. Andrew Keen legt een potentiële zwakte bloot in van het internet: hoe kun je iets vertrouwen als het anoniem is en reputatie er niet toe doet.Er is veel veranderd sinds het verschijnen van het boek, en reputatie lijkt een steeds belangrijkere rol te spelen.De Andrew Keen die ik zag op The Next Web in 2008 was dan ook al enigszins minder bezorgd (ter informatie, het boek kwam oorspronkelijk uit in 2007, maar is pas onlangs vertaald in het Nederlands) en zag tools zoals Twitter als ideale media om reputatie te verspreiden. Toch is dat niet nieuw. Ook voor Twitter bestonden er al blogs van 'autoriteiten'. Misschien b…

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Thursday at the Next Web

An article, posted about 11 years ago filed in , , , , , , & .

My ticket was sponsored by The Bean Machine.In this post summaries of different talks at The Next Web. Read more about the future of search, what Google would do, what Andrew Keen is thinking about the read/write web, what Matt Mullenberg, of Worpress, thinks about how the web should work and finally how well Andrew Keen and Chris Sacca get along.Future of searchCool presentation. Moving towards the semantic web, but acknowledging that most of the data is still not as well structured as one would hope. Search however is just a way to get a problem solved, it should not be a goal in itself. Presenter is proposing that search engines should move into task completion assistants (interpretated, e.d.). Neat idea. Lack of real time search is ridiculized by Hermione, but real time isn't important for everything in this world of course. Want to check it out: sandbox.yahoo.com.What would google do?Decomposing Google to its essence, their business ethic/way of working….

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