murb ♥︎ ruby

It may not be the fastest programming language, nor is it the most popular language when it comes to the numbers game, but how can you not fall in love with:

 10.times { print "Hello!" }

(instead of something like for(var i=0; i<10; i++){ console.log("Hello!"); })

Do things with sets like:

["a", "b", "c"] & ["b", "c", "d"] # gives you ["b", "c"]
[1,2,3] + [4,5] # gives you [1,2,3,4,5]
["a", "b", "c"] - ["b", "c", "d"] # gives you ["a"]

Or (with a little (opinions differ on this one ;)) help of Rails):

10.days.ago

That offers you exactly what you would think it would return: the date of 10 days ago.

And no ;’s, only brackets when absolutely needed, everything is an object…

Yes, it’s actually a language a human might understand, and still: it is pretty powerful, powering some of the most popular sites on the web, like AirBnB, Shopify, Basecamp (they’re the creators of Ruby on Rails), Github, Kickstarter, Twitch, Strava and many more (most of the full stack projects I did & do are using ruby).

When to use decorators

An article, posted 1 day ago filed in ruby, rails, ruby on rails, service, architecture, when to use & models.

Are you sure?

Decorators decorate your class with new set of functionality.

What are your decorators doing? Adding a few rendering specific methods to a class to help with rendering? Perhaps you should consider Presenters. But better: how will it scale, can it be grouped, will it really add the simplification. Be wary of too quick branching off functionality to decorators. Most cases I've seen them were overly architectured, and they didn't bring much value.

One might consider using Concerns or mixins as an alternative. The disadvantage here is that your main object gets more public methods, but I consider it as a feature after having experienced too much potentially reusable functionality grouped arbitrarily away in other presenter / decorator classes.

Continue reading...

I love you ruby, `unless`...

An article, posted 5 days ago filed in sorting, ruby & programming.

I'm quite familiar with writing ruby code. I've even expressed my love for the language long time ago. But some constructs still bug me. One of them is unless…

I've seen variants of this code:

temperature = 36.7
unless temperature &gt; 37.2 || temperature  35.5 &amp;&amp; temperature &lt; 37.2
  puts &quot;Healthy temperature. Temperature is within the normal range.&quot;
end

or perhaps even nicer:

if (35.5...37.2).include?
  puts &quot;Healthy temperature. Temperature is within the normal range.&quot;
end

Continue reading...

Sorting text

An article, posted about 2 months ago filed in sorting, ruby, programming, database, order, databases & sql.

There are a few hard problems in computing. Correctly handling time, naming, preventing off by one errors… sorting text may not be one of them but recently we ran into a discussion where I couldn't make up my mind anymore. Hence, this post's topic: sorting text.

The problem

How do you sort the following words:

  • cheese
  • Ape
  • Drums
  • dent
  • Beer

If you'd ask ruby I'd get:

 %w[cheese Ape Drums dent Beer].sort

Results in:

  1. Ape
  2. Beer
  3. Drums
  4. cheese
  5. dent

Which in my useless and ramshackle programmer's brain translates to, well why not, it is sorted right?

But then we moved the data into a database which was correctly set up with a proper locale for 'collation', a term that I've seen but never meant anything to me until this problem. Collation is:

> the assembly of written information into a standard order.

(thanks Wikipedia - Collation)

Databas…

Continue reading...

When to use x-objects?

An article, posted 6 months ago filed in ruby, rails, ruby on rails, service, architecture & when to use.

So I wrote a few short articles on when to use FormObjects and Jobs and ServiceObjects. The question is of course "it depends", but the leading principle I have is keep it simple. That being said, for inspiration, some suggestion for different layers to manage the application complexity from Vladimir Dementyev's talk on Railsconf:

Presentation

  • Controllers (standard Rails)
  • Channels (standard Rails)
  • Views (standard Rails)
  • Presenters
  • Form Objects
  • Filter Objects

Application

  • Authorization Policies
  • Jobs (standard Rails)
  • Event listeners
  • Interactors
  • Deliveries
  • Notifiers
  • Mailers (s…

Continue reading...

When to use Modules / Concerns?

An article, posted 9 months ago filed in ruby, rails, ruby on rails, service, architecture, when to use & modules.

Whenever your model gets too heavy?

The easiest way to clean up your classes might be to create smaller, more concise methods. The next easiest way of tiding up your models is moving stuff to modules (whether they are 'Concerns' or not). Modules can then be included in the final classes. It will lead to a crowded list of methods exposed on these classes, for which alternative solutions exist (Presenters, Decorators), but if you shield off private methods nicely and have a consistent way of naming things, I wouldn't be too concerned about that. Note that having many modules used in only a single class might be a code smell: perhaps you're trying to do too much with that single class.

Concerns or Modules?

When you're using Rails, you can make use of Concerns. They offer a few advantages over traditional modules, so use it whenever you're bothering recreating the same behaviour using plain old ruby Modules. I prefer consistency, so if you've adopted Concerns, use con…

Continue reading...

When to use Form-objects?

An article, posted 9 months ago filed in ruby, rails, ruby on rails, service, architecture, when to use, async, form & models.

When necessary.

It depends. By default I would advise against them; not creating Form objects to receive and validate data that could be validated by the Model directly. Even when you have a few nested attributes that belong to the main model modified, I would advise against Form objects. Keep It Simple.

But… sometimes you have more complex forms that don't fit the database-mirroring ActiveRecord model as nicely.

Continue reading...

When to use Job (or Worker) objects?

An article, posted 9 months ago filed in ruby, rails, ruby on rails, service, architecture, when to use & async.

Always.

When you are able to do stuff async (not blocking the web-request), make it async. It will also reduce the need for a category of Service-objects. Worker or Job objects can often be called inline if desired.

Sidenote: I personally prefer the "Job" object name, a Job that needs to be performed. Worker is a name that was popularised by Sidekiq, but Sidekiq moved to Jobs as well.

Continue reading...

Tag descriptor

When to use...

An article, posted 9 months ago filed in ruby.

I've got some opinions about certain ways of setting up more advanced (mostly Rails) applications. These might be short 'posts' which I might return to later. Let's see how it goes :)

Continue reading...

When to use Service-objects?

An article, posted 9 months ago filed in ruby, rails, ruby on rails, service, architecture & when to use.

Never.

There is of course never an absolute answer to stuff but if you are running it in a background job anyway have you considered directly writing it in a Worker or Job-object? Note that you can always run jobs async when needed.

My main objection against service objects is that all too often they are ill defined as a category. So while having fat controllers or fat models may be a bad thing, just creating a bunch of somewhat arbitrary 'Services' is not making the code more manageable.

When considering adding a 'services' directory to your app, try to think of what class of problems you want to tackle. And when in doubt, just keep messing around with the somewhat fatter models & controllers.

Continue reading...

Tag descriptor

pupprb

An article, posted more than one year ago filed in rubygems, ruby & gem.

pupprb is a simple wrapper around puppeteer, a tool maintained by Google Chrome engineers, which I primarily use to print PDFs. This gem simply wraps my default settings / approach in a relatively easy to reuse gem.

Source: @gitlab Rubygems: pupprb

Continue reading...

Tag descriptor

CentralLogin

An article, posted more than 2 years ago filed in ruby, CentralLogin, gem, rubygem, murb, authorization, authentication, roles, groups, resources, open source, mit, openid & oauth.

A simple OAuth provider. See below for more information, or check out the source of CentralLogin on GitLab. To integrate it with your ruby-apps, use the omniauth-central_login gem.

Continue reading...

Introducing CentralLogin, an OpenID Connect Provider

An article, posted more than 2 years ago filed in ruby, CentralLogin, gem, rubygem, murb, authorization, authentication, roles, groups, resources, open source, mit & oauth.

This app builds on the foundations of the Doorkeeper, Doorkeeper::OpenidConnect and Devise to provide a central login system.

While Doorkeeper supports other OAuth flows, CentralLogin focusses on OpenID Connect as it is a more complete, and hence useful standard, for most use cases where you want to support authentication & authorization.

This project builds on years of juggling with different authentication providers and implementations. It may cut corners to be a pragmatic and less flexible solution which you can host on your own. You don't have to tie your users to a closed authentication system such as Auth0, Azure Directory, Cognito (the horror, really, stay away from it) or something else. In the past I've been a happy user of Keycloak, which is definitely way more advanced than this project, but it in the end it is a Java application and hence harder for me to maintain and not focussed on what I think are the core requirements :)

So, are you in the market for:

  • a…

Continue reading...

Tag descriptor

Capistrano

An article, posted more than 2 years ago filed in capistrano, deployment, automation, ruby & docker.

Capistrano doesn't evolve as quickly anymore but it still delivers and is still being maintained. It dates from before docker & autoscaling kubernetes were in wide use. I still prefer the simplicity of the tool: Capistrano I can understand, it is just a nice layer on running scripts on a remote server. Below some posts I did on Capistrano.

Continue reading...

Installing ruby with Capistrano & rbenv

An article, posted more than 2 years ago filed in capistrano, rbenv, deployment, script, task, automation & ruby.

While we're supposed to create docker(y) images and deploy these to the cloud, I'm still comfortable deploying and maintaining quite a range of applications using Capistrano (this builds on the battle tested server management process that I outlined more than 7 years ago). But Capistrano and its plugins are typically aimed at performing application level tasks, and not so much about configuring the environment.

I typically install ruby using rbenv. To deploy ruby apps using rbenv a Capistrano plugin exist (capistrano/rbenv) but it is missing the commands to install and/or update the ruby installation.

This snippet presented here adds a few commands:

  • cap rbenv:install ## installs rbenv
  • cap rbenv:update ## updates rbenv & install…

Continue reading...

Introducing BrandingRepo (for Rails)

An article, posted more than 2 years ago filed in BrandingRepo, ruby, rails, gem, mit, open source, Git, design & clients.

Ever had the problem that you reuse the same project for a managemable number of clients? Too few to store branding materials in a database, but more than one making it hard to keep separate branches in sync?

Introducing BrandingRepo (for Rails)

The idea is simple: create a configuration file with those files that are specific to different brands/customers and store their mods in a different repository. Repository is quite a big word here: we simply create a config/brands folder in your current branch where you can push and pull your brand specific adjustments from. All managed in the same git repository.

What it is not:

  • it is not git within git.
  • it is not a design system, nor has it anything to do with it (I think perhaps with a few additional hacks it can be made to work with centrally managed gems/node-modules; like here: https://twitter.com/hopsoft/status/1451358882161332225?s=10)
  • it is not adding brand icons to your project

Installation

Add this …

Continue reading...

murb blog