De eerste vier zaken op een (macOS) ontwikkelmachine voor beginners

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  1. Update eerst naar de laatste versie van ’t OS, Mojave. Je kunt deze gratis downloaden in de App store, zie upgrade instructies voor Mojave.
  2. Installeer homebrew … macOS Terminal (zeg maar de Command Prompt van de Mac) vind je door Cmd+Spatie in te drukken en vervolgens "Terminal" te zoeken (meestal vind je die al na de eerste paar letters). Vervolgens de regel invoeren (kopiëren & plakken) die de website vermeld. Soms moet je extra dingen installeren; het script zal je daar doorheen leiden. Overigens, dat commando, Cmd+Spatie, opent wat Spotlight heet, ik vind dat de gemakkelijkste manier om programma’s te starten.
  3. Install Docker for mac (je hebt hier tegenwoordig helaas een account bij DockerHub voor nodig). Dit download een DiskImage, sleep het programma naar de programma’s map (zoals het image waarschijnlijk ook al aangeeft in de achterg…

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Must do speed optimalizations on nginx

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Nginx's default configuration needs a bit of extra configuration (at least on Debian systems) to enable gzip and client side caching. Two very quick wins for better performing web-apps.

Enabling gzip for more content types

Compression makes files smaller. By default only HTML is gzipped, but it it makes sense for quite a list of other file types too. This, however, excludes(!) images, which have their own methods of compression: compression over compression delivers you nothing, and costs you and your end-user a few more CPU cycles.

So find the gzip on; line in /etc/nginx/nginx.conf file (make sure it is not turned off or commented), and either uncomment the gzip_types-line or use this, more complete, line (including svg):

gzip_types image/svg+xml text/plain text/css application/json application/javascript text/xml application/xml application/xml+rss text/javascript;

Client side caching

Every browser has a cache of its own, …

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Setting up https/spdy communication for your website with nginx

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In case you do something with user accounts on your website, you definitely want to make sure you're using https. In general it protects the user's privacy, also when just reading content on your website. The only thing that can be seen by a middleman is that the person is viewing something at your server, the rest is all encrypted. And since Google has started to rank https-websites higher it has even become a SEO technique :) ). This article explains you how to serve your pages over https.

Update: a better option exists nowadays for non-domain validated certificates: Let's encrypt!

While the path to your server from someones desktop could be considered relatively ok in the past (harder to tap, putting a lot of trust in everything from the ISP to the internet exchanges and everything else in between), things have changed now. Wit…

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A somewhat secure Debian server with nginx, Passenger, rbenv for hosting Ruby on Rails with mail support and deployment with Capistrano

Basically this is a technical note to myself, in case I need to setup another server for running yet another personal Ruby on Rails project. And don't worry, I'm not going to replicate all nice guides out there, just filling in the gaps.

So let's start with the list of bookmarks I follow as a start. Note that in these tutorials mostly a user is used named 'deploy'. Typically I create a user per project and name databases etc. accordingly.

  1. Get security right first: My first 5 minutes on a server or essential security for Linux servers
  2. Then I get Rails up and running with this how to install Ruby on Rails with rbenv on Debian
  3. (in case you want to use the server as your remote git repo too) [Git setting up a remote repository and doing an inital push](http://the…

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